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Daniel Wu
Actor , Director
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Asians need to represent in America!|亞洲人要在美國發光發亮!|亚洲人要在美国发光发亮!|アメリカでアジア系が演じるには

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAbJgXUM4o4I'm back home in SF right now and my Mom of all people showed me this last night so I had to put it up. I blogged about this topic before a while back but it's good to hear the young kids out there voicing their opinion. I don't know KevJumba but he's speaking the truth, saying things I've been thinking since I was a kid. It's not that there are not any cool Asian guys out there, it's that mainstream America won't let us be anything more than than the "Long Duk Dong", asexual nerdboys or chopsocky kung fu guys or broken ass English triad guys.  I mean now you have guys like Masi Oka, Daniel Dae Kim and John Cho, but they are only given variations of that same old sterotype. Many people have asked me why haven't I made the transition back home, well to tell you the truth it's not up to me. It's up to America and the people in power in Hollywood to take the initiative to put someone like me or any one of the many other talented and cool Asian American Male actors out there in good roles. Just look at the talent on this site alone! Sung Kang, Jason Tobin, Dustin Nguyen, Roger Fan, Andrew Lin. Terence Yin, Andy On, Johnny Lu, Vanness Wu the list goes on and on. We all speak perfect English and were either born and/or raised in America and we have all paid our dues. Like the prelude to the Beijing Olympics motto: "We Are Ready!". Just open the doors, because we are ready to represent.

To all the KevJumba's out there, keep it up and make the message loud and clear because it's people like you that will help make that change. Peace! |

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAbJgXUM4o4我現在回到了舊金山的家,昨晚媽媽給我看這段視頻,我得放上來。之前我就這個話題已經寫過一篇博客,但能聽到孩子們說出自己的意見很好。我不認識 KevJumba,但他說出了真相,說出了我從孩提時就一直在思考的事。並不是沒有很酷的亞洲人,而是主流美國人不願意讓我們扮演除了 Long Duk Dong (註釋:Long Duk Dong 是約翰·休斯導演、編劇的80年代美國青春片代表作《十六支蠟燭》中的角色)、性別不明的討厭男孩、成本低廉的功夫片人士或操著蹩腳英文的三合會成員之外的角色。你說你們現在有了 Masi Oka、丹尼爾·金和約翰·周,但他們其實還是在同樣的老舊角色上稍有變化而已。許多人問我,為什麽沒有回家演戲,好吧,告訴你們真相,那由不得我。這取決於美國,取決於在好萊塢擁有權勢的人們,他們是否願意讓我這樣或許多其他很有天分、很酷的亞裔美國籍男演員出演一些好角色,制造一些改變。只需看看我們這個網站的優秀演員! Sung Kang、Jason Tobin、Dustin Nguyen、範姜弘青、連凱、尹子維、安誌傑、路斯明、吳建豪...名單很長很長。我們都講流利英文,在美國出生及成長,也受到良好教育。就像北京奧運會的口號:"我們準備好了!" 請敞開大門,因為我們已經準備好發光發亮。

致所有的 KevJumba 們,請繼續大聲、明確表達你們的意見,因為只有人們喜歡你,才能幫忙做出改變。和平!|

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAbJgXUM4o4我现在回到了旧金山的家,昨晚妈妈给我看这段视频,我得放上来。之前我就这个话题已经写过一篇博客,但能听到孩子们说出自己的意见很好。我不认识 KevJumba,但他说出了真相,说出了我从孩提时就一直在思考的事。并不是没有很酷的亚洲人,而是主流美国人不愿意让我们扮演除了 Long Duk Dong (注释:Long Duk Dong 是约翰·休斯导演、编剧的80年代美国青春片代表作《十六支蜡烛》中的角色)、性别不明的讨厌男孩、成本低廉的功夫片人士或操着蹩脚英文的三合会成员之外的角色。你说你们现在有了 Masi Oka、丹尼尔·金和约翰·周,但他们其实还是在同样的老旧角色上稍有变化而已。许多人问我,为什么没有回家演戏,好吧,告诉你们真相,那由不得我。这取决于美国,取决于在好莱坞拥有权势的人们,他们是否愿意让我这样或许多其他很有天分、很酷的亚裔美国籍男演员出演一些好角色,制造一些改变。只需看看我们这个网站的优秀演员! Sung Kang、Jason Tobin、Dustin Nguyen、范姜弘青、连凯、尹子维、安志杰、路斯明、吴建豪...名单很长很长。我们都讲流利英文,在美国出生及成长,也受到良好教育。就像北京奥运会的口号:"我们准备好了!" 请敞开大门,因为我们已经准备好发光发亮。

致所有的 KevJumba 们,请继续大声、明确表达你们的意见,因为只有人们喜欢你,才能帮忙做出改变。和平!|

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAbJgXUM4o4

今、僕はサンフランシスコの家に帰ってます。昨夜、母をはじめみんながこのビデオを僕に見せるのです。だから、このビデオを取り上げましょう。この話題については過去にも扱いましたが、若い子が自分の意見を発言することは喜ばしいことなのです。僕はこのKevJumbaを知らないのですが、彼の言っていることは正しく、正に僕が子供の頃から考えてきたことなのです。クールなアジア系の男がいないのではなくて、アメリカの主流派が我々アジア系には、ちっともセクシーでないオタク君や、カンフー映画のカンフー男、もしくは目茶目茶な英語の中国マフィア野郎のような、いわば"Long Duk Dong"以上のものをさせてくれないのです。僕はマシ・オカだったり、ダニエル・デ・キムに、ジョン・チョーのことを言っているのです。彼らには、古臭いステレオタイプの役しか与えられません。大勢の人々が僕にどうしてアメリカに帰って来ないのかと聞きますが、正直に言いましょう。それは、僕にはどうしようもないのです。アメリカで、ハリウッドで主導権を握る人々が、僕や他のクールなアジア系の男性俳優を良い役をくれればいいのです。このサイトに集う才能を見てください!スン・カン、ジェイソン・トービン、ダスティン・ニューヤン、ロジャー・ファン、アンドリュー・リンです。テレンス・イン、アンディー・オン、ジョニー・ルー、ヴァネス・ウーもそれに続きますし、もっともっと続けられます。僕たちはみんな完璧な英語を喋りますし、みんなアメリカ生まれかアメリカ育ちで、国への義務を果たしています。北京オリンピックのオープニングテーマのように、”ウィー・アー・レディー!”なのです。単にドアを開ければいいのです。僕らはいつでも演技ができます。

KevJumbaへ。君の主張を声高に、そして明確に伝え続けるんだよ。君のような人たちこそが、変化を助けるんだからね。ピース!

almost 14 years ago 0 likes  144 comments  0 shares
Photo 108412
that's so true .. but the only people who can actually change that are Asians!
over 13 years ago
Photo 41044
Wrote about this in a recent paper! (and used your involvement with AnD too...hope you don't mind). Nice to see more people raising consciousness.
over 13 years ago
Photo 22998
The way movies are made is that someone with money decides that if they put "X" in theaters, people will go and/or buy/rent the DVD. People will go/buy/rent if they know about it and something in the project seems interesting. This could be subject matter, it could just be an actor. For a while, people wanted horror, horror, horror - now... not so much horror is desired. But people always respond to their favorite celebrities. Now, while no one wanted to see Arnold Schwarzenegger doing Shakespeare, they did see him in roles other than "The Terminator" - and his celebrity even led them into see movies like "Twins" - where it was obviously not his type. That is to say... whatever the state of things... whatever the impression... Celebrities who can get magazine coverage and spots on shows to promote a movie - they're the ones who have the power to change this more than anyone else. You know, obviously, I'm a white guy and other than this site and a few friends, this particular issue doesn't affect me personally - but I do see it very similar to a lot of other issues - notably the portrayal of African Americans in movies and it was the actors who made that change. A lot of African American actors got their chance in the gang-movie craze or by playing a slave in a historical piece... but when they had an audience, they just started making movies that led their audience to a different kind of film. There is always a way to scale a movie's budget to match the size of the potential audience in order to offer something different. Also - I think if people are trying to do this they need to be conscious to drop any Asian references at all. The scripts should be totally non-Asian specific... just good stories. If you don't think this would work, or your curious what I'm getting at, drop me a line and I'll get more into the minuteau.
over 13 years ago
Mariejost 26 dsc00460
Isn't Will Smith the highest paid actor in Hollywood these days? Things are changing in Hollywood if the suits can see that a hip black dude can sell movies not only to US audiences, but to world audiences. I don't need to tell you that most Hollywood movies make back their investment in the US and make their real profit in international release and DVD sales. Hollywood has to be convinced that an Asian guy who is not a gangster or a martial artist can sell tickets around the world. Asians are appearing in more believable and nuanced roles on television all the time. Granted, most of them are guest-star one-offs and not starring roles in a series, but the Asian face of multicultural America is beginning to appear on our television screens. Maybe it took 15-20 years of Black television shows to spawn the crossover stars like Will Smith, Denzel Washington and Halle Berry. Hopefully, since the US is much more multicultural than it was in the 70s and 80s, it will take much less time for a breakout Asian star to appear and get roles based on his/her appeal and talent and not necessarily only on their "Asian-ness".
over 13 years ago
Mariejost 26 dsc00460
enigma306, I don't imagine you were born yet in the 70s and saw the beginning of mainstream Black television programs. As a White suburbanite, I saw it as definitely a seismic shift in American culture. It took a couple of generations after real African-Americans began to be represented on television before they began to show up in films. In the 70s, we had Blacksploitation, which was produced by African-Americans for other African-Americans, so wasn't isn't always the White Man trying to keep the Black man down. About Latinos--Latino is an ethnic and not a racial category. A Latino can be primarily African, Indigenous American (Indian), European or any combination of the above. Some Latinos are White. Some are Black. Some are Indian. Many are a combination and members of the same family will have skin tones that vary widely and facial features that favor more one ancestor than another. So, with Latinos, you can have a Cameron Diaz (who is only half-Latino anyway) or an Antonio Banderas (Spanish, which can also be a mix of European, Moorish and Jewish ancestry) or a J. Lo (Puerto Rican, which can be more or less Indian, depending, mixed with European and African) or Celia Cruz (Afro-Cubano). Latino is so many different things, and they are all Latino. Russian Jews in Argentina are Latino, but so are Indians in Chiapas. Latino is cultural and historical much more than it is racial. Sadly, Hollywood isn't the only one behind the use of White looking Latino actors. Latin American soap operas are the worst offenders of all!
over 13 years ago
Chungtsang 5b chungtsang
We need more awareness especially since we're a small minority in the US. But if we all raise our collective voices, we will be heard. It's more important that we do this so we don't have people like Representative Brown in Texas asking Chinese people to change their names.
over 13 years ago
Daniel
OK, I'm happy to see the response here but this is not a us vs them issue and let's keep it that way. So making a movie with Asians kicking white people's asses won't solve any problems. I saw some of the comments on Kevjumba's youtube page and there is a lot of hate there which I don't support. Just to clarify...Long Duk Dong is a character from 16 Candles a John Hughes movie from the 80's. Look up my old blog on that. Also, Blaxploitation films were films produced by mostly white people directed towards a black ghetto audience, unfortunately all they did was support stereotypes. It wasn't until the 80's with Spike Lee and Hip-Hop music that African Americans started to have a voice. Almost 30 years AFTER the civil rights movement. Yes patience is a virtue but it's a bit like waiting in line all day at the DMV x 35 years(for me), frustrating right?.
over 13 years ago
45862083 0af2fd4d5d
entertaining.... and true! speed racer too!
over 13 years ago
Photo 22991
yep racism still lingers on as do stereotypes of asians in Hollywood. They equate chinese to only kungfu fighting for the few cool characters if not, mostly the baddies. Well, i guess u'd want to have a chance to dispel or break their warped one track thinking.
over 13 years ago
Photo 22998
Daniel - I don't know if it's fair to say that blaxploitation was mostly by white people because there were filmmakers like Melvin Van Peeples (Mario's father) who saw an opportunity to make a film that would sell and took it. This happened again in the 80's with the gang films - there were fortunes being made not only by white producers... but yes, it was the filmmakers and actors who finally just started making movies which didn't involve any stereotypes which shifted things (as you indicated). However, I think it's important to say that it isn't just avoiding stereotypes - it's an issue of just "dealing with other issues." Before spike lee hit the scene, Bill Cosby ended his decade + run of "Fat Albert" - a kids series about kids who were in the Ghetto and decided to make a show about a very wealthy black family because that was simply never seen before. It debued at number three because people knew Cosby and therefore were willing to give it a shot. Low and behold, it was entertaining: It was number one five years in a row - in one of the peak TV eras in history. The key thing was it was a show about a family, just like any other show. I think it took someone creating something entertaining for audiences to tune in. I don't think audiences have any desire to see people represented in any particular way. And producers usually just think of whatever was done before that worked. It's filmmakers, writers, actors who need to take on the responsibility of pushing for work which simply deals with "other things." Once that is proven, it gets easier and easier. By the way I think Yes_Tom makes a good point about the YouTube demographic, I've noticed this too. And notice that I think people like community channel don't really ever talk about being Asian... she just doesn't make it an issue. KevJumba does, but that's his thing. happyslip is just playing with her family from a personal level.)
over 13 years ago
Liannelin 1d liannelin
I have so many thoughts about this. Big production companies don't care about making a progressive statement or getting rid of stereotypes to improve the future - they care about making money. Asians are still the smallest minority in America, and therefore the smallest audience. So they will not make movies to appeal to us as an audience. (Yet!) (When I first came to LA I'd go to modeling auditions and when the call was for "any ethnicity," i knew i had the smallest chance of getting the job compared to the other races. i'd see white or black girls there and know i was wasting my time because the casting people want the audience to "relate" to the person they see in the ad or on the screen.) Most Americans see Asians still as outsiders because they don't know enough Asians to know we are all the same underneath if we were born in the same country. They haven't had the chance to get to know one of us on a deeper level and only know what they see on tv. It's not always their fault -- sometimes they just haven't grown up around us. but others are completely insensitive and racist, and those types make me MAD! It's been popular for many years for comedians to make racist jokes, and people copy them and assume it's funny to everyone, and if you don't like it, you "have no sense of humor." thus, stereotypes are continuously perpetuated and spread further. guess what, it's not funny. people in LA especially think this stuff is so hilarious and i'm sick of it. (the Asian driver jokes especially are making me CRAZY!!!) i'm ready to move to Taipei and be a minority no more! maybe when i come back after a few years things will be even better. Asians are making our mark in America, it just takes time.
over 13 years ago
Chungtsang 5b chungtsang
What the hell, the ads coming up by Google is crap too.. 'Asian Girls for Marriage' 'Single Asian Women'. Even within this video, we're getting crapped on. Come on, we need the founder of YouTube (a Taiwanese Guy) to put a stop to that. Btw, props to your mom for showing you this.
over 13 years ago
Mariejost 26 dsc00460
I see I should have been more explicit in my comments. I am not saying that the way Asians are portrayed in Hollywood is anything to be proud of. In fact, most of what Hollywood does is so offensive to me that I watch very few Hollywood movies. I am tired of having my intelligence insulted by the junk that Hollywood turns out. Its hack treatment of just about everyone, the puerile scripts, the second-rate acting or worse yet, good actors trying to turn pap into something watchable, drove me away from H'wood years ago. What I am saying is that, at least in terms of showing more realistic depictions of non-White Americans, television has historically been in the lead. I am not saying that it is going to take 30 years for Asians to be protrayed more realistically in film. America was mostly White (majority) and Black (minority) in the 70s when we saw the first representations of believable characters on television. Today, America is a much more multicultural place. I live in the Southeastern US, but I see people of many different ethnic backgrounds wherever I go: where I shop, where I work, around town, on local television. American is no longer the land of a monolithic majority and primarily one minority clamoring for attention and a dignified place at the table. I don't watch much television, but I am seeing more believable treatment of a wide variety of ethnic groups on television. Americans of all ethnicities are getting a sense of how many different groups live in this country and live here as real people with real lives, in some ways like their own, in other ways, perhaps, different. So, yes, it is frustrating to see Hollywood up to its old tricks of trying to appeal to the least common denominator with junk that demeans and insults so many. But it is not all totally bleak. I do think Americans are primed and ready for a more realistic treatment of non-Whites films because they are already seeing this on some television programs.
over 13 years ago
Photo 22998
spelmandiva - interesting points. To clarify, I really have ony one point which is: You can't control "the world" - you can only make choices for yourself. So - as a community of artists - if this issue is troublesome, the only real solution is to be proactive. This is the solution as I see it. There is an enormous Asian audience. Regardless of what projects were done to make them famous, there are definitely Asian talents who are coveted by that audience. Budgets need to be scaled (for now) to take a calculated risk for the Asian stars to be featured in NON Asian themed projects where their core fan base could cover the expenses and would leave room for the "break out hit" which would be a cross-over and change perception. Those break outs will be what establishes the global perception shift. (By the way, though, examples of non-stereotyped roles happen all over... alivenotdead's own Susane Lee just starred on Gray's Anatomy and her role could have been any ethnicity. Ken Leung on lost has only made one single reference when he said he didn't speak Korean. That's a huge show, he's a lead role. A little more attention paid to the fact that this IS happening an that audience are totally accepting of it would go a long way in changing global perceptions. People are sheep, they believe what they hear. If they hear "Oh - today isn't like it used to be, Asians are playing all kinds of roles." Then that's what they believe and will accept. If they only hear "Asians are only allowed to play certain roles." Then that is what they will believe to be true and what they'll believe is a foregone conclusion to remain true. Yes, in marketing there involves a period of bending reality to change reality. But that's how it works. )
over 13 years ago
Mariejost 26 dsc00460
There are smart depictions of "minorities" (which in a few years, taken together, will outnumber the White majority) on television. I am a huge fan of Numb3rs. This show features a Jewish American family, a father and two grown sons (a math genius and his FBI agent brother). The show also has series regulars that are African-American, South Asian, Afro-Caribbean, and one who is very mixed race and is probably from someplace like Hawaii. Because the show is set in LA, it often features Asians and mixed race Asians in supporting roles, often as FBI agents and techs. They also have a recurring guest role for a Native American. Sometimes race/ethnicity is part of the week's script, but mostly, like in real life, it just is and people go about their jobs and their lives like real people. So yeah, there are some people who are smart, informed and culturally aware in H'wood. Maybe they are just not making too many big-budget blockbuster wannabe movies.
over 13 years ago
Photo 22998
I wasn't going to comment anymore, but someone mentioned representation and for some reason I actually wondered how the Screen Actor's Guild representation of actors who have been working would compare to the US population. If you're in a movie or on a TV show, you're in the guild. So, while it's not the most scientific method, it seems an interesting short hand to see how many faces one might see on the screen of a particular ethnicity. I present the numbers with no commentary, just putting it out because I looked them up and maybe someone else would find them interesting. I could only (easily) find the 2004 numbers and wasn't inclined to hunt down the more recent numbers... but here you go. Screen Actor's Guild Membership in 2004: (APIA is Asian Pacific Island American) APIA: 2.9% African Am: 13.8% Latino/Hispanic: 5.5% Caucasian: 74.5% US Population 2004: APIA: 4.4% African Am: 12.8% Latino/Hispanic: 14.1% Caucasian; 80.4% resources: http://www.sag.org/content/tv-performers-again-take-hit-from-reality-programming http://www.census.gov/popest/states/asrh/SC-EST2004-04.html
over 13 years ago
Desmondso
Totally agree, Daniel. Today, there is NO dearth of talented Asian actors, both male and female. The problem is that there are too few Asian executives in the Hollywood system (studio bosses, producers, agents). The few who have made it are often reluctant to push for an Asian lead because (i.) they don't want to give the appearance of favoritism; or (ii.) they got where they are because they have aligned themselves with mainstream America (I say this as a matter of fact, not as a criticism or in a disparaging way). I witnessed this on a number of occasions when I worked at a big-3 TV network back in the US. To those Asian brothers and sisters in the business side of Hollywood, you have the power to influence the way Asians are perceived in America and around the world! That is an awesome responsibility that should be handled with thought and care.
over 13 years ago
Photo 38345
HAHAHA... this is hilarious... yes we are cool...super cool.. way too cool for whites to accept out coolness!! the boy in the vid is so cuteee too..;-) LOL wait, but big film production houses in hollywood are owned by jap ppl...so why dont they do anything about it? wait, asian doesnt translate well in the massmarket....thats why.. maybe we really are uncool?? hmm
over 13 years ago
Photo 36943
Hi Daniel, I hope that you actually read the comments to your blog. It could be a great way to have an actual dialoge. But while I REALLY agree with you that Asian men in particular are kind of locked into a stereotypical role in American film and television. I think it sucks that you say that Hollywood has kept the door locked for you in your transition. I met with Steven Lo SVP at The JC Group in late 2006 who represented himself as your manager. We pitched to him a film that I wanted you to be the lead in. It was an ENGLISH language film that we had interest from Disney and Warner Asia to distribute. It was a TRUE cross over film. I started to hear through the grapevine that Steven was not actually your agent, then I tried to get ahold of you through this site to no avail. While its easy to say that big bad Hollywood is keeping the asian man out of respectable roles... There is a HUGE business component in play too. Studios as I have learned, do not like taking risks... It effects the bottom line. And they don't care about who is represented in film, they care about how much money they make. Its up to the filmmaker and their vision to get the talent they want attached to a project and to make the case to their investors. But it REALLY sucks when the talent you want is blocked from you by their Asian company. Who probably didn't want them to even make a cross over into American film, for fear to THEIR bottom line. Anyways... I am sure that you are a cool dude. And I hope that you REALLY know someday that "Hollywood did come-a-calln" , But Steven Lo at JC Group never told you.
over 13 years ago
Photo 73131
Plenty of independent projects are being made and there's not a whole lot from stopping Asian American artists from making them. Good roles can be written by one's self instead of having to rely on others. I don't blame America for giving lesser roles to Asian American artists. Frankly speaking, a majority of American audiences and makers simply don't understand Asian Americans and I don't expect them to any more than I am expected to understand them. And then there's the business side of things... And seriously, who's taking up these "Long Duk Dong", asexual nerdboys, triad gangsters, or chopsocky kung fu roles? If principle is so important these roles can be refused. The matter of the fact is: money talks. Movies are expensive. Gambling millions is still very risky. If Asian American movies made big money, Hollywood would totally open it's doors. But they don't so neither does Hollywood. I wouldn't bag too hard on the kung fu roles; I love what Bruce, Jackie, Jet and others have brought to action cinema. Hong Kong cinema wouldn't be as strong if not for these types of movies and roles. Apparently, America and the world love them too.
over 13 years ago
Mariejost 26 dsc00460
For those who want to dig deeper into this topic, University of California-Berkley has an on-line bibliography of books, articles and reviews on the topic of Asians/Asian Americans in Film and Television. Anyone with access to a decent university library should be able to access many/most of these sources. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/imagesasiansbib.html
over 13 years ago
Photo 35692
Daniel, I am really feeling you on this. As an aspiring screenwriter, I've written meaty roles for Asians, if I can just get my films into production! As a journalist, I've drawn attention to this topic. http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-3386-film-advancing-the-game.html However, I disagree about John Cho; he's played some roles that completely shatter Asian stereotypes. Uh, James Mar, if you like kung fu movies, that's fine, but Asian-Americans can do ALL kinds of film, not just this. As far as America "not understanding Asian-Americans," that may be right in some respects, but you need to remember that Asian-Americans ARE Americans, and people too, who can play 3-dimensional roles.
over 13 years ago
Photo 73131
elena, absolutely, Asian Americans can play 3-dimensional roles, even kung fu guys like Jackie have more acting chops than most people give him credit for. Arguably, his American movies leave much to be desired but I don't think he's taking those roles for respectability. I truly believe though if artists want to make respectable movies for themselves, they can do it. Especially the ones with either a lot of wealth or power. There are Asians and Asian Americans with sufficient wealth and power. You may not be able to convince them or others to market an Asian American movie like a mainstream movie, but the roles can be anything desired. If people like Ang Lee, John Woo, Wong Kar Wai, Wayne Wang demanded good Asian American roles in their American films, I don't think they would be denied (unless they were lead roles). It seems to me, even when Asians or Asian Americans get to high levels of power, they still play Hollywood's game because they know it's better for the market. If star popularity (leading to star power) is of main concern, that's not for anyone to choose other than audiences. On a related subject, I think the caucasian lead casting for a movie like 21 is a complete travesty. But if I were a businessman, and someone asked me which I would expect to be more palatable for American audiences, a caucasian lead or an asian lead, I would have to admit a caucasian lead. Progress is and has been made for Asian Americans, though there's a long way to go. All this is very challenging, but if this is the current situation of things, you can't expect someone else to just hand a meaty role to Asian Americans on a silver platter. Make your own dishes. I totally think if Daniel came back to the States and played some good indy roles, it may not be "big", it may not change Hollywood, but it would help. Hollywood blockbuster and "good roles" are pretty inconsistent anyway if you ask me.
over 13 years ago

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Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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July 27, 2005
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English,Cantonese,Mandarin