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Susanne Chan
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Ball Of Feet Problem

The soles of our feet must withstand all the pressure placed upon them during our lifetime by walking, running and standing. According to Foot Pain Info, there are 26 bones and associated ligaments in the foot, structured to allow the foot to function as a shock absorber and a lever. Foot pain can affect any part of the foot. Pain on the sole of the foot can be felt under the heel, in the middle of the foot under the arch and under the ball of the foot due to a variety of conditions. Plantar Fasciitis and Heels Spurs

Calluses. Calluses are composed of the same material as corns - hardened patches of dead skin cells formed from keratin - but calluses develop on the ball or heel of the foot. The skin on the sole of the foot is ordinarily about forty times thicker than skin anywhere else on the body, but a callus can double this normal thickness. A protective callus layer naturally develops to guard against excessive pressure and chafing as people get older and the padding of fat on the bottom of the foot thins out. If calluses get too big or too hard, however, they may pull and tear the underlying skin.

RICE The acronym RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) is used to remind people of the four basic elements of immediate treatment for an injured foot. People should get off injured feet as soon as possible (Rest). Ice is particularly important to reduce swelling and promote recovery during the first forty-eight hours. A bag or towel containing ice should be wrapped around the injured area on a repetitive cycle of 20 minutes on, 40 minutes off (Ice). An ace bandage should be lightly wrapped around the area (Compression). The foot should be elevated on several pillows (Elevation). foot pain explained

One explanation for the incredible intricacy of the foot is that it is rather small compared with the rest of the body. It is only a few inches bigger than the hand, and yet, could you imagine walking around all day on your hands? The impact that each and every step has on the foot Hammer Toes boggles the mind. It is said that the force of a single step is about fifty percent greater than that person's total body weight. So, if you weigh two hundred pounds, you are putting three hundred pounds of pressure on your foot each time you take a step. No wonder we need shoes!

The symptoms of heel spurs are nearly identical to those for plantar fasciitis (above). There is pain in the front of the heel and possibly in the arch. The pain probably seems particularly acute when taking your first steps of the day or walking after a long period of sitting down. When you have a heel spur, unlike with plantar fasciitis, you will feel pain when you press the front of the heel, at the intersection of the heel and the arch, pressing up and backward toward the heel. This is where the heel spur has formed - it's a pointy extension of the heel bone.

In today's high-fashion world, lack of willingness to give up these types of shoes is regrettable. However, with the use of orthotics for high heels, metatarsalgia can be relieved with consistent wear. It is advisable to choose shoes that have a heel with a less than 2" heel and with a wider-profile heel such as a wedge to avoid future ball of foot pain. If pain occurs at the end of the day, consider switching to flat dress shoes for several days per week to allow the feet some time for increased blood flow which will help feet heal in between wearing higher heels.

A human foot is a complex formation of 26 bones. Generally the feet are the basis of mainly all physical movements and activities. When a person suffers from foot pain , it maybe a sign that there is could be wrong with any of the inside structure of the foot or with the condition of the foot as it interacts to outside factors, like shoes and walking grounds. On the other hand an injury to the bones and joints of the foot can also be factors that caused this kind of pain. Commonly slight foot pain can react to simple home medication causing pain to drop.

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